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Skara Brae Blether

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Whit’s a body tae dae wi’ drookit May wether
wi’ seas gang ow wild, ow howl’in, ow a’blether?
We culd ha’look’d glaikit, oor thumbs ow a’twiddlie
standin’ like stooks, oor jist look’in oot thae windie

Whit’s a body tae dae in wether sae bleary n’crabbit?
wi’ skies ow sorry puggle’d, ow dreary, n’wabbit?
We set oot a’roamin’ Skara Brae’s Pict’ish strand
tae laff wi’ thae sea birds soar’in o’er thae land

We stravaig grassy fields an’ haird aboot a gale
a storm uv thae cent’ury tha hammer’d doon hail
Ae tempest, we haird, quick swallow’d thae coast
unearth’d ancient hoos’es, n’chiss’d oot auld ghosts

Watch’d o’er by Laird Watt, lang laid tae rest
wi’ Skaill House oor witness, we felt rather bless’d
Tae outwit sich blustery wether as weel as we did
in thae end, whit’s a body tae dae but gather yin’s wits?

An thenk thae Al’michty fur wha’ days micht howlde
if bound n’determine’d yin micht alwa’s find gowlde

© 2012 S. Michaels
Alba Songs

Author’s Note: An aura of history & mystery surrounds auld Skaill House and its nearby neolithic ruins of Skara Brae,  an ancient ‘village’ found embedded in the beach near Skaill after a great winter storm in 1850. Skara Braie may date back as early as 2500 BCE. Now, the Old Scots words I coined may not be used quite ‘richt’ but I hope you find them as interesting as I did when I found them:  ‘drookit’ (drenched or soaked); ‘blether’ (long-winded);  ‘glaikit’ (silly or sensless); ‘windie (window); ‘crabbit’ (ill-tempered); ‘puggled’ (worn out); ‘wabbit’ (weak, pale); ‘stravaig’ (wandering); ‘chiss’ (chase); ‘gowlde'(gold). As for the rest, I’ll leave up to your imagination…

Author: LightWriters

Life. Faith. Wellness.

3 thoughts on “Skara Brae Blether

  1. Wonderfully said, Susan! (A trek around Scotland! We’re drooling over here! – just caught that in your comment) While reading your words, I couldn’t help but be reminded of one of my favorite airwaves preachers, Allistair Begg. I have to intently tune in to his teaching to follow much as is required to read these words. 🙂 Beautiful message! Thanks good friend and God bless.

  2. I am beginning to warm a little to your brand of Scots. 🙂

  3. Interesting post Susan.

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